Sailing Through the British Virgin Islands

Virgin Gorda

Sailing through the British Virgin Islands was a once in a lifetime experience. From dawn until dusk I couldn’t believe the beauty before my eyes. Waking up, diving into the crystal clear water, swimming with turtles and nurse sharks.  Then proceeding to island hop the day away.  Stopping at abandoned islands to mud bathe, old pirate ships to jump off the top deck, or visiting the famous baths at Virgin Gorda.  There is no shortage of adventure to be had when it comes to the BVI’s.

A group of islands situated in between the Atlantic and the Caribbean, there are over 100 islands to explore.  On this particular trip, I was on a charted sailboat, which took me to various stops throughout the BVI’s.  The captains were more than experienced, so I was able to sit back.  Relax.  And not have to worry about planning.

 

 

Sailing Through the British Virgin Islands

 

Day One – St. Thomas to St. John

Fly into St. Thomas; take a taxi from the airport to the harbor.

Sail to St. John

Enjoy the white sand beaches of St. John from Beach Bar during happy hour

Anchor in Caneel Bay

 

Day Two – St. John to Jost Van Dyke

Wake up in St. John

Anchor at Maho Bay turtle sanctuary – here you can swim with turtles, nurse sharks, and an array of fish!  Make sure to bring your snorkeling gear!

Sail to Jost Van Dyke

SWIM to the Soggy Dollar most notably famous for creating the Painkiller.  A tropical drink that has spread wide and far. It’s called the Soggy Dollar because your dollars should be soggy after swimming to the bar.

Finish up your night by dancing the night away at Foxy’s

 

Day Three – Jost Van Dyke to Tortola with a Stop at Little Jost Van Dyke

Sail to Little Jost Van Dyke

Stop at B-Line Beach to enjoy an entire beach to yourself (if you’re lucky)! We happened to be the only people on the entire beach, not counting the one person who runs the beach bar.

Sail to Tortola

Upon arrival take the ferry to Marina Key for dinner at De Loose Mongoose

 

Day 5 – Tortola to Virgin Gorda

Sail to Virgin Gorda

Anchor at Leverick Bay – flag down a taxi to take you to the infamous Baths! Find your way through the rock formation to experience jaw-dropping views of the white sand beach and crystal clear water known as Devil’s Bay

 

Day 6 – Virgin Gorda to Anegada

Sail to Anegada – Anegada is the furthest island from where I started at St. Thomas

Rent scooters to explore the island and make sure to stop by Cow Wreck Bar for drinks

Eat dinner at Anegada Reef Hotel where fresh lobster is caught and served straight from the ocean. You’ll be sitting with your feet in the sand, so feel free to leave your shoes behind!

 

Day Seven – Anegada to Norman with Stops at The Dogs and Salt

Sail to The Dogs

Crystal clear water for some of the best snorkeling

Sail to Salt

The island is called Salt because, surprise, it has an all-natural salt reservoir! A family owns the island but allows people to come visit whenever. Underneath the salt is mud so give yourself an all natural mud bath before heading back to the ocean.

Sail to Norman

Swim to Willy T’s to jump off the top deck. This ship in the middle of the ocean once was a pirate ship that had been abandoned.  It has now turned into a bar and restaurant.

 

Day Eight – Norman to St. Thomas

Return to St. Thomas to catch your flight home

 

Pin Me!

Sailing through the #BritishVirginIslands is a once in a lifetime trip.  Find out which islands to hit as you cruise through clear Caribbean waters.

Follow:
passportsandpreemies
passportsandpreemies

Kylee splits her time between being a traveling NICU nurse and a solo traveler. Spending half her time at the bedside, Kylee has been caring for premature babies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit for over four years now. When she’s not doing that she’s traveling around the world sharing real and authentic experiences. She began Passports and Preemies in 2017 to help prevent nurse burnout by utilizing travel on days off.

Find me on: Web | Twitter | Instagram | Facebook

1 Comment

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.